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Healthy Aging

Who Should Follow a Gluten-Free Diet?

There is lot of advice floating around these days about how to avoid gluten, but very little about how to tell if a gluten-free diet is the right choice for you.

Dealing with Changes in Taste and Odor Perception

Part of eating well is enjoying our food. Changes in the ability to taste and smell can interfere with that joy. Unfortunately, these two senses often diminish with age, which can harm our choices of foods, along with our enjoyment. Acknowledging and addressing changes to taste and smell can help bring pleasure back to the plate.

Could Healthy Gut Microbes Help Preserve Muscle as We Age?

As we age, the strength and size of our muscles tend to decrease. This loss of muscle mass and function, called sarcopenia, is associated with decreased independence and reduced quality of life. Staying active (and purposefully incorporating muscle-strengthening exercises) is essential, but emerging data suggest that nourishing our gut microbes could be important as well.

Diet and Alzheimers

Alzheimers disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of the loss of memory and other cognitive abilities collectively known as dementia. There is no known food or diet that can prevent or cure Alzheimers dementia, but diet may help delay onset and slow progression.

The Common Bowel Problem Nobody is Talking About

Its time to talk about constipation. Infrequent bowel movements or difficulty passing stools is extremely common, particularly for older adults. Chronic constipation affects up to 40 percent of adults over age 60 and, in a 2017 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing, older adults reported this ongoing condition negatively impacted their physical and mental health, as well as their social functioning.

Protein Supplements May Not Help Older Adults Build Muscle

A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that consuming protein supplements did not help active older men build more muscle or gain more strength than resistance exercise training alone. Forty-one men with an average age of 70 completed whole-body resistance training three times a week for 12 weeks. Half the group drank a supplement containing 21 grams of protein after exercise and every night before bed. The other half drank a beverage with the same number of calories but no protein. At the end of the study period, while both groups were able to lift more weight and tests showed increased muscle mass, the protein group did not improve any more than the placebo group.

Muscle Loss, Obesity, and Cognitive Performance

As people get older, the body tends to lose muscle mass and strength. This process is called sarcopenia, a term coined by Friedman School professor and former dean Irwin Rosenberg. Sarcopenia can make activities of daily life more difficult and increase risk of falls. A recent study in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging looked at whether sarcopenia could be a predictor of reduced cognition.

Is Extra Protein Enough to Preserve Muscle With Aging?

Protein is essential to good health. You need it to make hair, blood, enzymes and antibodies-and, of course, muscle. The problem: With aging we tend to gradually lose muscle size, strength and function-a relatively common condition called sarcopenia. It may seem like a no brainer to boost your dietary intake of protein to help prevent sarcopenia and the frailty and increased risk of falls it can lead to.

Long-Term Couples Sense of Smell and Taste Become More Similar Over Time

The longer couples stay together, the more similar their smell and taste preferences become, researchers report in Appetite. Although a number of studies have found that romantic partners become more similar in various ways over time, this is the first study to see if this compatibility effect extends to smell and taste, which help to shape food preferences.

The Link Between Your Walking Pace and Aging Well

Walking may seem like a pretty simple activity. But, several different parts of your body are involved, like your heart, lungs, nerves, muscles and bones. So, your walking pace may slow if you're having a problem in one or more of these parts of the body.