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I f youre at risk for osteoarthritis of the knee, light exercise such as walking or bowling can reduce your odds of develop- ing that painful condition. But strenuous exer- cise such as skiing, soccer, running or playing basketball can lead to cartilage damage and start an osteoarthritis cascade, a new study warns. Even if youre not at risk, too much knee bending can damage cartilage.

To Protect Arthritis-Prone Knees, Dont Overdo Exercise

I f youre at risk for osteoarthritis of the knee, light exercise such as walking or bowling can reduce your odds of develop- ing that painful condition. But strenuous exer- cise such as skiing, soccer, running or playing basketball can lead to cartilage damage and start an osteoarthritis cascade, a new study warns. Even if youre not at risk, too much knee bending can damage cartilage.

Sit or Get Fit?

New research makes the choice clearer than ever: Physical activity is key to living healthier longer, while inactivity shortens your life. If you need a push to get off the couch, a flurry of new research should provide plenty of motivation. The findings about the negative effects of inactivity and the benefits of physical activity couldnt be more stark: Sitting too much is dangerous for your health, while getting fit helps protect everything from your waistline to your brain

Drinking Orange Juice May Help Combat Bad Cholesterol

T hat morning glass of OJ might be doing some good for your cholesterol numbers. In a new study published in Nutrition Research, Brazilian scientists report that orange juice made from concentrate reduced unhealthy LDL choles- terol levels in patients with high cholesterol.

Can Dietary Antioxidants Reduce Your Risk of a Stroke?

A new Italian study reports that antioxidants in the diet were associated with a reduced risk of the most common kind of stroke. Among 41,620 study participants, those with diets highest in total antioxidant capacity (a measure of several different antioxidant compounds and their interactions) were 59% less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke. Such strokes occur as a result of an obstruction within a blood vessel supplying the brain

Cran-tastic! Nutritious cranberries are good for you-and good for more than just sauce.

Although we may think of cranber-ries only at Thanksgiving time-as that perfectly formed cylindrical sauce from a can-these red gems have lots more to offer on both the culinary and nutritional fronts. Cranberries can now be found fresh, dried, canned or as juice in supermarkets everywhere. Supplements even tout the health benefits of cranberries in a convenient pill form.

Vitamins E and C Disappoint in Cataract Prevention

T he longest placebo-controlled trial to date to test whether antioxidant vitamins reduce the risk of cataracts has failed to fnd such a beneft for the supplements. Because oxidative damage is a prominent feature of cataracts, one focus of nutrition research has been the link between dietary intake of nutrients with antioxidant potential, particularly vitamins E and C, and the risk of cataract, explained William G. Christen, ScD, of Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and col- leagues, writing in Archives of Ophthalmology.

Mediterranean-Style Diet Linked to Slower Mental Decline

Heres more evidence that eating like a Mediterranean might help protect your aging brain: In a new study comparing the eating habits and mental abilities of nearly 3,800 older Chicagoans, those who stuck most closely to a Mediterranean-style diet pattern saw a slower rate of cognitive decline with aging. People who ate most like Mediterraneans had brains that functioned as if they were several years younger

The Heat Is on Red Meat Does new research mean farewell to steak and...

hanksgiving is the only American holiday not traditionally associated with eating red meat. But Turkey Day may be a trendsetter if the current onslaught of negative news about the health effects of red and processed meats continues: July 4th grilled fish… Labor Day roast chicken… Christmas tofu…

Extra Sugar Adds 475 Calories a Day

Nutrition experts have been warn- ing us to watch added sugars for at least a decade, but Americans are still struggling to follow that advice. Rachel Johnson, PhD, MPH, RD, of the Univer- sity of Vermont, incoming chair of the American Heart Associations nutrition committee, told a recent conference that Americans average 475 daily calories from added sugars. Thats far more than the AHAs recommended maximum of 100 daily calories from added sugars for women and 150 for men-and equivalent to a whopping 30 teaspoons a day. So we have a long way to go, Johnson told attendees at the American Dietetic Association Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. Added sugars and solid fats total about 35% of the calories in the average diet, she added; the recommended maximum is 5%- 15%. To start scaling back on added sugars, Johnson advised simply avoiding sugary soft drinks, the source of about 36% of added sugars in the US diet. But dont worry about naturally occurring sugars, such as in milk or plain versions of cereal or yogurt, she said. Check the label to see if sugar in any form is listed among the ingredients.