Healthy Heart

Diet and Cancer Prevention

According to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), 20 percent of all cancers diagnosed in the U.S. are related to poor dietary choices and lack of exercise. So what should we eat, and what should we avoid? News outlets and the internet are full of (sometimes conflicting) reports claiming links between specific foods or nutrients and cancer. Many of these claims are based on a limited number of studies. But when researchers analyze all of the research on cancer and nutrition together, it becomes clear that increasing intake of individual foods or popping dietary supplements doesnt work. Overall dietary pattern, however, can make an important and significant difference.

Walnuts May Lower Cholesterol

A review and analysis published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested that eating walnuts could improve blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides) without causing weight gain or increasing blood pressure.

Multivitamin Use Does Not Help Heart Health

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes concluded that multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplementation does not protect against cardiovascular disease.

Q. I take fish oil for heart health, but some of what I read...

Q. I take fish oil for heart health, but some of what I read in the health press says fish oil doesnt do much. Should I stop taking it?

Q. I often read that to help reduce risk of heart disease, I should...

Q. I often read that to help reduce risk of heart disease, I should limit processed meats. Are low-sodium deli sliced turkey breast and uncured turkey pastrami better choices?

Q. What is cardiometabolic disease and how is it different from cardiovascular disease?

Q. What is cardiometabolic disease and how is it different from cardiovascular disease?

Diet Central In New Blood Pressure Guidelines

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have released an update to guidelines that redefines high blood pressure (hypertension) and makes recommendations on how doctors should treat it. The guidelines lower the threshold at which a person would be diagnosed with hypertension. Under the new standard, its estimated that 46% of American adults can now be diagnosed, or about 100 million people. The guidelines set a lower bar for what will be considered hypertension. Though voluntary, the guidelines are likely to influence how some doctors advise and treat their patients.

New Blood Pressure Target Announced

In November 2017, The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology released new treatment guidelines that call for lowering the threshold for diagnosing high blood pressure from 140/90 to 130/80.

Step Away from the Smorgasbord

With the holidays approaching, a new study in PLOS One reinforces the importance of staying a good distance away from festive food tables to help avoid overeating.

The Lowdown on Leaky Gut

As the popular depiction of leaky gut goes, damage to the lining of the small intestine can release undigested food particles, bacteria and toxins into your bloodstream. And, that can potentially spur a myriad of health problems ranging from digestive issues to joint pain. Without a doubt, this description is oversimplified and misleading. But, its worth looking at whether leaky gut-or more precisely, increased intestinal permeability-is a legitimate concern.