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5 Things the Nation’s Nutrition Experts Want You to Know Now

5 Things the Nation’s Nutrition Experts Want You to Know Now

Thumbs up for eggs, coffee and sustainability, down for added sugars. But overall diet is key.

May 2015 - Yes, eggs are back on the menu, and not only is it OK to wash them down with a cup of coffee (watch the cream and sugar), it may even be good for you. On the other hand, you should cut down on added sugars. But those headlines from the recently released report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) aren’t the most important takeaway from the every-five-years review of scientific evidence. That should be the importance of a healthy overall dietary pattern.

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What’s Really in Your “Dietary Supplements”?

What’s Really in Your “Dietary Supplements”?

You may not be getting what you pay forand you need to consider what supplements mean to you.

Surveys have shown that a large majority of Americans are confident in the “safety, quality and effectiveness” of products marketed as “dietary supplements” (a term derived from a 1994 law that questionably grouped drug-type herbal and botanical extracts with essential vitamins and minerals). So many were shocked at the recent news that four out of five popular herbal remedies sold at some of the nation’s leading retailers didn’t contain any of the promised ingredients.

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Avocados Could Improve Your Cholesterol—and More

Avocados Could Improve Your Cholesterol—and More

Health benefits from nutrients and good fats help push soaring sales.

Not so long ago, avocados were a seasonal delicacy in most of the country, and when they were available, their high fat content scared away health-conscious consumers. With loosened import rules from Mexico, however, sales of Hass avocados (about 95% of the US market) have more than doubled in the past decade. Last year, Americans peeled about 4.25 billion avocados, and in February avocados even boasted their own Super Bowl commercial.

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Oranges vs. Orange Juice: Which Is Better?

Oranges vs. Orange Juice: Which Is Better?

Whole fruit has more fiber, but new research finds some nutrients more accessible in juice.

Readers of this newsletter know that drinking fruit juice is no substitute for consuming whole fruits. Processing fruit into juice loses most of the fiber, often adds sugar, and damages some of the nutrients that make fruit such a healthy choice. But people who nonetheless like to start their day with a glass of orange juice can take some encouragement from a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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Staying Highly Fit Slows Signs of Aging

Staying Highly Fit Slows Signs of Aging

Older people who are highly fit, such as recreational cyclists, are physiologically more similar to young people than to more sedentary seniors. That’s the conclusion of a new British study that sought to explore the effect of physical activity on key indicators of aging. As one scientist put it, “Being physically active makes your body function on the inside more like a young person’s.”

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Court Mostly Backs FTC vs. Pomegranate Claims

Court Mostly Backs FTC vs. Pomegranate Claims

In what may prove a landmark ruling for food and beverage health claims, a US appeals court largely upheld a Federal Trade Commission order requiring proof of promises made for a popular pomegranate-juice drink. In its original 2010 order, the FTC had challenged magazine advertisements for POM Wonderful that claimed the beverage combats heart disease and other ailments.

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Get Fit Now to Keep Your Brain Sharp Later

Get Fit Now to Keep Your Brain Sharp Later

Early fitness linked to cognitive health with agingbut its not too late.

A new study reports that the more physically fit you are when you’re younger, the more likely you are to keep your brain sharp as you get older. But there’s also good news for those who slacked off in their youth: Even starting to get more fit now might still improve your cognitive health.

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