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Don’t Give Up on Weight Loss Because of

Don’t Give Up on Weight Loss Because of "Biggest Loser"

August 2016 - If you followed the headlines about a recent study of contestants in the "Biggest Loser" reality-TV show, you might be despairing about your own chances of maintaining a healthy weight. The study, published in the journal Obesity, tracked contestants appearing on the show’s eighth season, with 14 of the 16 willing to be re-measured six years later. On average, participants gained back more than two-thirds of the pounds they lost on the program’s extreme diet and exercise regimen; some are even heavier now than before.

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Eating Fruit Daily Linked to Lower Cardiovascular Risk

Eating Fruit Daily Linked to Lower Cardiovascular Risk

Topping cereal or yogurt or as snacks or desserts, fruit can be part of a healthy dietary pattern.

If you need more motivation to substitute an apple or a pear for that bag of chips or indulgent dessert, a new Chinese study might help you reach for the fruit bowl or bag of berries in the freezer. In the most comprehensive such research to date, following a half-million people for seven years, greater fruit consumption was associated with lower risk of heart attack and stroke.

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Coffee Drinkers at Reduced Odds of Colorectal Cancer

Coffee Drinkers at Reduced Odds of Colorectal Cancer

Those who drink the most are at only half the risk.

More evidence that coffee - once thought of as bad for you - is not only safe in typical amounts but might actually help protect your health comes from a new study of colorectal cancer risk. Researchers compared 5,145 patients who had been diagnosed with colorectal cancer within the past six months with a control group of 4,097 men and women with no history of the cancer.

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Keep Active to Protect Your Brain

Keep Active to Protect Your Brain

Exercise may delay mental aging, preserve gray matter.

Two new studies provide important evidence of how physical activity might reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of cognitive decline. One study reported that participants who were most active showed the least decline - the equivalent of 10 years of mental aging. In a second study, the most active older adults were found to have the largest volume of gray matter in brain regions typically affected most by Alzheimer's.

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Keep Your Summer Picnic Food Safe

Keep Your Summer Picnic Food Safe

Don’t let foodborne illness spoil your outdoor fun.

Summer is picnic and outdoor barbecue time - which also makes it prime time for foodborne illnesses. Warm, humid weather encourages the growth of bacteria, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), but so can human factors such as lax outdoor sanitation and inadequate refrigeration. The combination causes foodborne illness to spike in summer months.

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Worried About Diabetes or Your Heart? Eggs Not Harmful

Worried About Diabetes or Your Heart? Eggs Not Harmful

No need to feel guilty about eating eggs in moderation.

Two recent studies suggest egg lovers aren't at higher risk of type 2 diabetes or coronary artery disease. In a new meta-analysis, egg consumption was largely unrelated to risk of type 2 diabetes. And in a population study, egg consumption was not associated with increased incidence of coronary artery disease among men, even those with a genetic risk factor.

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Green Tea Extract Fails to Fight Fat or Boost Bones

Green Tea Extract Fails to Fight Fat or Boost Bones

Study in overweight and obese women finds no difference between pills and placebo.

Don't count on green-tea pills to help you lose weight or keep your bones strong. A new clinical trial testing year-long supplementation of green-tea extract reports no difference between the pills and placebo in changes in body mass index, total fat mass or percentage of body fat, or bone-mineral density.

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