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Diabetes Diet: What to Eat

Diabetes Diet: What to Eat

Foods for Diabetes: What you eat can make a big difference in how much diabetes impacts you in the short term and over the long run.

February 2017 - One of the biggest challenges many people face when they find out they have diabetes is figuring out what they can eat and when. Fortunately, healthy eating when you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) isn't substantially different from how we all should eat. Diabetes-friendly meals feature the same healthy foods - whole grains, colorful non-starchy vegetables, whole fruits, lean protein, fish, low-fat dairy, nuts and healthy fats - recommended for everyone.

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Berries

Eat Well to Keep Mind Sharp

What you eat could have a big impact on memory and thinking.

Increasingly needing to write yourself reminder notes or repeatedly bumping into furniture after rearranging your living room (spatial memory) is frustrating, to say the least.

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6 Winning Super Bowl Snack Ideas

6 Winning Super Bowl Snack Ideas

The big game doesn't have to derail your healthy eating plan.

Claimed to be the second largest eating extravaganza next to Thanksgiving, the Super Bowl is infamous for indulgent fare such as pizza, fried hot wings, chips, rich dips, sugary sodas and beer.

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Eating to Beat Belly Fat

Eating to Beat Belly Fat

Focus on an overall healthy dietary pattern to help trim your waistline.

You may begrudge belly fat because it makes it tougher to fit into your clothes, but a bigger reason to whittle your waistline is for your health.

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Emerging Science on White Potatoes and Disease Risk

Emerging Science on White Potatoes and Disease Risk

Scientists are investigating the health effects of these light-fleshed tubers.

There's a lot to like about spuds. They're super-versatile, satisfying, affordable and store well. Yet, there's concern this dietary staple may be bad for your blood sugar, heart and weight.

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