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It’s Never Too Late to Eat Your Fiber

It’s Never Too Late to Eat Your Fiber

Increasing fiber after a heart attack linked to reduced mortality risk.

October 2014 - Higher cereal fiber intakes are associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease, and now a new study shows cereal fiber is also associated with decreased risk of dying after surviving a first heart attack. Researchers analyzed pre- and post-heart attack data on more than 4,000 people over nine years. Those who increased their cereal-fiber intake after a first heart attack were 35% less likely to die of cardiovascular causes.

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Broccoli & Grape Tomato Frittata

Broccoli & Grape Tomato Frittata

This easy baked frittata (a flat Italian omelet), featuring the synergistic combination of broccoli and tomatoes, is perfect for spring brunches and simple suppers. Even if you are cooking for just one or two, it is worth making because leftovers are delicious reheated in the microwave—enjoy them for a ready-made, protein-rich breakfast the following day. A mixture of whole eggs and egg whites helps keep the saturated fat in check. It can be disheartening to discard the extra egg yolks. To eliminate waste, use liquid egg whites, available the refrigerated egg case in supermarkets.

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Quinoa Salad With Mediterranean Flavors

Quinoa Salad With Mediterranean Flavors

This hearty yet refreshing salad is perfect for potlucks, picnics and backyard barbecues. It provides the benefits whole grains and lots of colorful vegetables in one dish and requires no last-minute preparation. The base of the salad is quinoa, which although it is treated like a grain, is actually a seed. It is gluten-free and it supplies complete protein, as well as magnesium and fiber. Quinoa has a delicate, nutty flavor and cooks in less than 20 minutes. You can find it in natural foods stores and many supermarkets.

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Vegetarian Chili with Roasted Squash

Vegetarian Chili with Roasted Squash

A robust chili is an excellent candidate for a vegetarian entrée because the beans provide both protein and fiber, while the spice blend contributes a complex flavor. We serve this hearty chili in an edible bowl of roasted squash. Not only does this make an attractive presentation, the squash tastes great with the chili and packs even more nutrient-rich produce into your dinner. (If you are pressed for time, omit the squash; the chili makes a satisfying meal all on its own and leftovers taste even better the next day.)

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Green Tea May Enhance Working Memory

Green Tea May Enhance Working Memory

Extracts improve connectivity between key parts of the brain.

A small clinical trial suggests that green tea could improve the connectivity between parts of the brain involved in tasks of “working memory.” You might think of working memory as the brain’s sticky notes, where bits of information are temporarily held for manipulation before forgetting or transferring to long-term memory.\n

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New Evidence Links Fruits and Vegetables to Longevity

New Evidence Links Fruits and Vegetables to Longevity

Eating even more than five a day might be better.

If you’ve been trying to follow the advice to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, two new studies might inspire you to try harder—and to aim for even more daily produce. Both studies found even greater benefits from consuming more than five daily servings of fruits and vegetables.\n

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Ask Tufts Experts

Q Your August newsletter article on BMI and age was very interesting. How much of the change in ideal BMI, however, is due simply to a person losing height, as often happens with age, which would cause the BMI to increase even if weight is the same? Should an older person’s BMI be calculated based on maximum height (when younger) or current height?

Q I’ve heard that foods from the nightshade family are supposed to aggravate arthritis. Is this true? Are some nightshade foods worse than others?

Q I read about a study that found individuals with a high intake of vitamin E had a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. I have been taking 1,000 IU daily. Now I read in your newsletter (June 2014) that men taking vitamin E supplements were more likely to get prostate cancer. What should I do?