Send me Your FREE
Health & Nutrition Updates

Tips on ways to live longer, healthier and happier.
Enter your email below.

How Good Is Glycemic Index as a Marker of a Heart-Healthy Diet?

How Good Is Glycemic Index as a Marker of a Heart-Healthy Diet?

Slow carbs, fast carbs - does it really make a difference?

March 2015 - Does the glycemic index of the foods you eat matter? That’s the question raised by a headline-making new study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the OmniCarb study, which calls into question the notion of “good carbs” versus “bad carbs.” Some previous research—along with popular diet plans—suggested that it’s healthier to choose carbohydrate sources that raise blood sugar levels slowly. These “low-glycemic index” foods include most whole grains and non-starchy vegetables, as opposed to high-glycemic options such as white bread, potatoes and sugary foods.

Continue Reading

New Research on High Blood Pressure: What You Need to Know

New Research on High Blood Pressure: What You Need to Know

Studies suggest benefits from salt substitutes, exercise, protein and flaxseed.

About one in three American adults, some 67 million people, have high blood pressure, one of the most dangerous risk factors for stroke. If you’re age 65 years or older, the odds are even greater that you have hypertension.

Continue Reading

Are You Seeing All the Health Benefits of Carrots?

Are You Seeing All the Health Benefits of Carrots?

Versatile veggie may reduce risk of chronic disease.

Bugs Bunny, always depicted munching on a carrot, may have been onto something. Researchers have found that carrot consumption not only helps insure an adequate intake of a variety of important nutrients and fiber, but may also reduce your risk of chronic disease.

Continue Reading

Putting B Vitamins for Brain Protection to the Test

Putting B Vitamins for Brain Protection to the Test

Supplements lower homocysteine levels, but do they help the brain?

Could extra B vitamins reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia by lowering blood levels of an amino acid called homocysteine? That tantalizing promise was put to the test in two recent large-scale studies, and in both cases researchers proclaimed the results disappointing. But other experts say the jury is still out, particularly for people with low B-vitamin status or those who are already experiencing cognitive decline.

Continue Reading

Special Supplement: TV Medical Shows: Scientific Static

Special Supplement: TV Medical Shows: Scientific Static

When it comes to getting advice from doctors on TV, you might be just as well off consulting the fictional Marcus Welby, MD, or Dr. Kildare rather than the real physicians on popular talk shows. A new study published in the journal BMJ analyzed recommendations from 40 randomly selected episodes of each of the two highest-rated medical programs, “The Dr. Oz Show” and “The Doctors.” Overall, barely half the 160 recommendations could be supported by scientific evidence.

Continue Reading

Get Fit Now to Keep Your Brain Sharp Later

Get Fit Now to Keep Your Brain Sharp Later

Early fitness linked to cognitive health with agingbut its not too late.

A new study reports that the more physically fit you are when you’re younger, the more likely you are to keep your brain sharp as you get older. But there’s also good news for those who slacked off in their youth: Even starting to get more fit now might still improve your cognitive health.

Continue Reading

Ask Tufts Experts