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New Evidence if Brain Benefits from Following a Mediterranean - Style Diet

New Evidence if Brain Benefits from Following a Mediterranean - Style Diet

Diet with extra olive oil protected cognition, while nuts maintained memory.

August 2015 - A newly published followup to findings from a study of the so-called Mediterranean diet adds to the evidence that such an eating pattern, especially when it includes nuts and olive oil, may help protect the aging brain. Results from a subgroup of the Spanish PREDIMED study showed that those assigned to a Mediterranean diet held steady in cognition while a control group declined. While previous observational studies have linked a traditional Mediterranean-style dietary pattern to cognitive protection, this is the first such evidence from a large randomized clinical trial.

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Nicotinamide Linked to Fewer Recurrent Skin Cancers

Nicotinamide Linked to Fewer Recurrent Skin Cancers

Vitamin B3 compound benefits those at high riskbut no substitute for sunscreen.

If the headlines about a drug related to B vitamins helping to prevent skin cancer tempted you to toss your sunscreen and broad-brimmed hat, think again. The findings were exciting because the hope of preventing cancer with vitamins has largely proven elusive, and the researchers declared their results ready to put into clinical practice.

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Smart Choices Key to Keeping Pounds Off as You Age

Smart Choices Key to Keeping Pounds Off as You Age

Combating middle-age spread is more complicated than just counting calories.

Popular coverage of diet and weight-loss strategies often summarizes the bottom line with a twist on President Bill Clinton’s campaign mantra, “It’s the economy, stupid.” When it comes to managing your weight, as this line of thinking goes, “It’s the calories, stupid.” But a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition challenges this conventional wisdom.

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Is It OK to Put Eggs Back on Your Plate?

Is It OK to Put Eggs Back on Your Plate?

If youre going to embrace the good news about eggs, do so carefully.

The humble egg has been on a roll lately. First, the US Department of Agriculture recalculated the amount of dietary cholesterol in a typical large egg downward—from 215 to 185 milligrams—and vitamin D upward (to 41 IU, 10% of the Daily Value). Then, earlier this year, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) concluded, given current intakes of dietary cholesterol in the US, it was no longer necessary to recommend that most people limit dietary cholesterol to 300 milligrams daily.

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Brief Walks May Counter Health Dangers of Too Much Sitting

Brief Walks May Counter Health Dangers of Too Much Sitting

Moving around as little as two minutes per hour reduces risks.

Multiple studies have warned about the health risks of sitting too much. Hours spent sitting, whether at desks or in front of the television, have been linked to increased odds of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and kidney problems. But modern life can make it difficult to stay out of chairs, and alternatives such as “standing desks” don’t appeal to everyone.

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New Evidence Your Heart Loves Nuts

New Evidence Your Heart Loves Nuts

Two new studies strengthen the scientific link between nut consumption and better cardiovascular health.

If you grew up thinking of nuts as a not-very-good-for-you indulgence, there’s a growing pile of evidence that should change your mind about these healthy foods. “For a long time, consumers thought that coffee raises blood pressure, eggs cause heart disease, chocolate is an unhealthy treat, and nuts make you fat,” says Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD, director of Tufts’ HNRCA Antioxidants Research Laboratory. “However, such conclusions were often based on very little science and several mistaken assumptions.”

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Are You Keeping Your Brain in Shape?

Are You Keeping Your Brain in Shape?

Staying active may help protect your brains motor functions.

Physical activity helps preserve mobility and motor skills as you age—and not just by keeping your muscles in shape. A new study suggests that activity also maintains mobility by protecting your brain. Even in people with signs of brain aging called white matter hyperintensities (WMH) associated with movement issues, being more active seemed to allow the brain to compensate.

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