Send me Your FREE
Health & Nutrition Updates

Tips on ways to live longer, healthier and happier.
Enter your email below.

New Evidence Your Heart Loves Nuts

New Evidence Your Heart Loves Nuts

Two new studies strengthen the scientific link between nut consumption and better cardiovascular health.

June 2015 - If you grew up thinking of nuts as a not-very-good-for-you indulgence, there’s a growing pile of evidence that should change your mind about these healthy foods. “For a long time, consumers thought that coffee raises blood pressure, eggs cause heart disease, chocolate is an unhealthy treat, and nuts make you fat,” says Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD, director of Tufts’ HNRCA Antioxidants Research Laboratory. “However, such conclusions were often based on very little science and several mistaken assumptions.” The latest news in nuts’ rehabilitation comes from two studies spotlighting the heart-health benefits of almonds and peanuts.

Continue Reading

Are You Keeping Your Brain in Shape?

Are You Keeping Your Brain in Shape?

Staying active may help protect your brains motor functions.

Physical activity helps preserve mobility and motor skills as you age—and not just by keeping your muscles in shape. A new study suggests that activity also maintains mobility by protecting your brain. Even in people with signs of brain aging called white matter hyperintensities (WMH) associated with movement issues, being more active seemed to allow the brain to compensate.

Continue Reading

What Can Yogurt Do for You?

What Can Yogurt Do for You?

In addition to being a nutrition powerhouse, yogurt might benefit your waistline and even your brain.

Americans consume more than $7 billion a year worth of yogurt, with hundreds of new yogurt products introduced annually. In survey after survey, consumers say the healthfulness of yogurt is top among the reasons they eat it. Research confirms yogurt consumption correlates with a host of health benefits.

Continue Reading

Healthy Reasons to Put Farro on Your Plate

Healthy Reasons to Put Farro on Your Plate

Chefs are rediscovering ancient grainsmaybe you should, too.

The ancient Roman legions knew something that modern chefs are only now rediscovering: Farro, a form of wheat that originated in the Middle East’s Fertile Crescent thousands of years ago, offers nutrition enough to march on with a nutty taste and pleasantly chewy texture.

Continue Reading

7 Surprising Sources of Added Sugar

7 Surprising Sources of Added Sugar

Foods dont have to be sweet to contain the added sugar experts say to avoid.

ugar is in the crosshairs of the nation’s nutrition experts, with the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for the first time recommending limiting added sugars to no more than 10% of daily calories. (See the May newsletter for the complete story.) The US Food and Drug Administration, meanwhile, has proposed a separate listing for added sugars in its updated Nutrition Facts panel. “Unquestionably, there is no benefit from high intakes of added sugar,” says Tufts professor Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, who served as vice-chair of the DGAC, “and for most people there are adverse effects.”

Continue Reading

What Do Those Food-Label Terms Really Mean?

What Do Those Food-Label Terms Really Mean?

We crack the code behind confusing terms such as natural, reduced, light and extra to help you shop smarter.

A trip to the supermarket can feel like running a gauntlet of buzzwords. This product promises it’s “reduced sodium,” while that one is “natural” and “gluten-free.” Is a food “made with extra fiber” better than “excellent source of fiber,” or vice versa? Just how low in calories does a food have to be to boast that it’s “low-calorie”—and should you pick that label over one that’s “lower calorie” or “light”?

Continue Reading

Staying Highly Fit Slows Signs of Aging

Staying Highly Fit Slows Signs of Aging

Older people who are highly fit, such as recreational cyclists, are physiologically more similar to young people than to more sedentary seniors. That’s the conclusion of a new British study that sought to explore the effect of physical activity on key indicators of aging. As one scientist put it, “Being physically active makes your body function on the inside more like a young person’s.”

Continue Reading

Ask Tufts Experts