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March 2019

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full Issue PDF —Subscribers Only

Articles

Why the Low-Fat Diet Failed

In the 1980s and 1990s, Americans were told that eating less fat would reduce risk for cardiovascular disease and obesity. Why didnít it work? Essentially, reducing total fat led to intake of more refined carbohydrates and less healthy fats, and both of these changes had negative health impacts.

Diet and Alzheimer’s —Subscribers Only

Alzheimerís disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of the loss of memory and other cognitive abilities collectively known as dementia. There is no known food or diet that can prevent or cure Alzheimerís dementia, but diet may help delay onset and slow progression.

The Common Bowel Problem Nobody is Talking About —Subscribers Only

Itís time to talk about constipation. Infrequent bowel movements or difficulty passing stools is extremely common, particularly for older adults. Chronic constipation affects up to 40 percent of adults over age 60 and, in a 2017 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing, older adults reported this ongoing condition negatively impacted their physical and mental health, as well as their social functioning.

Ask Tufts Experts

Q. I’ve hear that Natto is good for preventing blood clots. Could you please comment on the benefits, if any, of these Japanese fermented beans?

Q. Iíve hear that Natto is good for preventing blood clots. Could you please comment on the benefits, if any, of these Japanese fermented beans?

Q. Nutritional websites and Nutrition Facts labels all seem to list different amounts of potassium in one cup of frozen spinach. How can this be?

Q. Nutritional websites and Nutrition Facts labels all seem to list different amounts of potassium in one cup of frozen spinach. How can this be?

Q. I have heard that a person who is allergic to wool should take vitamin D2 instead of D3. Is this true?

Q. I have heard that a person who is allergic to wool should take vitamin D2 instead of D3. Is this true?

NewsBites

No Weight Loss Boost from Intermittent Calorie Restriction —Subscribers Only

A randomized controlled trial recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found little difference between an intermittent calorie-restricted diet and a traditional continuous calorie-restricted diet. This well-conducted study followed 150 overweight or obese participants for fifty weeks.

Aerobic Activity May Improve Executive Functioning

A randomized trial published in the journal Neurology suggested that aerobic exercise may have neurological benefits for adults at risk for cognitive decline. One hundred and sixty sedentary participants with cognitive impairments (but no dementia) were randomly assigned to one of four study groups: aerobic exercise alone, DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet alone, a combination of aerobic exercise plus DASH diet, or health education alone.

Flavanols from Food Likely Better than Supplements

A recent study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, determined that isolated flavanols did not have a beneficial impact on systolic blood pressure and other cardiometabolic markers.

No Heart or Cancer Benefit from High-Dose Vitamin D

The New England Journal of Medicine recently published a study that found high-dose vitamin D supplementation provided no protective benefit with regard to risk of developing either cancer or cardiovascular disease.

Special Reports

Fish: Why (and How) to Choose this Healthful Protein

Dietary guidelines from governments and health organizations around the world agree: a healthy dietary pattern includes around two servings of fish a week. Most American adults get less than the recommended eight ounces per week. What makes fish such an important part of a healthy diet, and what are the best choices for health and the environment?