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July 2018

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full Issue PDF —Subscribers Only

Download The Full Issue PDF

Articles

The Latest on Calcium and Vitamin D for Bone Health

A federal advisory panel, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), has released updated recommendations on calcium and vitamin D supplementation for bone health.

Is Extra Protein Enough to Preserve Muscle With Aging? —Subscribers Only

Protein is essential to good health. You need it to make hair, blood, enzymes and antibodies—and, of course, muscle. The problem: With aging we tend to gradually lose muscle size, strength and function—a relatively common condition called sarcopenia. It may seem like a no brainer to boost your dietary intake of protein to help prevent sarcopenia and the frailty and increased risk of falls it can lead to.

Fatigue in Older Adults? It’s Probably Not Low Iron —Subscribers Only

Decades ago, TV commercials for Geritol cautioned viewers about “iron-poor, tired blood,” helping to create a misconception that if you feel worn-out and fatigued, you could reverse it by taking an iron supplement.

Ask Tufts Experts

Q “Is it true that Americans eat excessive omega-6 fatty acids in proportion to omega-3s? Is it unhealthy?”

Q “Is it true that Americans eat excessive omega-6 fatty acids in proportion to omega-3s? Is it unhealthy?”

Q “Do nut butters have the same nutritional value and health benefits as raw and roasted nuts?”

Q “Do nut butters have the same nutritional value and health benefits as raw and roasted nuts?”

Q “I have been seeing more and more about A2 milk and its supposed health benefits. What is A2 milk, and is buying A2 milk worth the hype?”

Q “I have been seeing more and more about A2 milk and its supposed health benefits. What is A2 milk, and is buying A2 milk worth the hype?”

NewsBites

Seeing Smaller Portions Creates New Normal

Reducing food portion sizes may shift a person’s perceptions of what is a normal amount of food to eat and induce them to choose smaller portions next time, suggests a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers recruited participants for the study from staff and students at the University of Liverpool, UK, to participate in a series of three laboratory experiments lasting up to a week.

Diet Quality Lags In US-Born Blacks

A new study from Tufts found that foreign-born blacks—predominantly from countries across the Caribbean and Africa—tend to consume a higher-quality diet than US-born blacks, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Their eating patterns include more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids, in comparison to native-born blacks.

Healthy Lifestyle Adds 12 to 14 Years —Subscribers Only

Maintaining five healthy habits is associated with more than a decade of additional life expectancy after age 50, according to a study in Circulation. The habits include never smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise at the recommended levels, moderate alcohol intake and a healthy dietary pattern. The observational study was based on data from two epidemiological studies of health professionals that included more than 123,000 women and men followed for 34 years, as well as data from nationally representative surveys.

US Food Waste About A Pound Per Person Daily —Subscribers Only

Nearly a pound of food per person is wasted each day in America, according to a study in PLOS One. Researchers examined data on Americans’ eating habits as well as estimates of food loss, including waste, at multiple stages in the food system, spanning the period from 2007 to 2014. Of 22 food groups studied, fruits, vegetables and mixed fruit and vegetable dishes (39% of the total) contributed the most to food wasted. That’s because these types of foods tend to be the most susceptible to food spoilage.

Special Reports

The Care and Feeding of Your Immune System

There seems to be no limit to the promises on the Internet for foods and dietary supplements that allegedly “boost” or “support” your immune function. There’s more than a grain of scientific truth in it, and the prospect of enhancing immune function with nutrition is a busy area of research—some of it by scientists at Tufts’ Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.