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June 2018

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full Special Supplement PDF —Subscribers Only

Download The Full Issue PDF —Subscribers Only

Articles

MIND Diet for Better Brain Aging

Currently available medical treatments for age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease have had limited success. Adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle has been among the most consistent recommendations to maintain brain health over the long term. Some studies have linked an overall healthy dietary pattern to less chance of experiencing age-related decline in memory and other cognitive skills.

Diet-Related Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer —Subscribers Only

Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the US, with 140,000 new cases forecast for 2018. Research has linked dietary factors to colorectal cancer risk. Processed meats are associated with higher risk, whereas high-fiber diets are associated with lower risk, although it is unclear how this happens.

The Food-Vision Connection —Subscribers Only

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in Americans over age 65. As AMD progresses, it permanently damages the portion of the eye’s light-sensing retina (the macula) that provides sharp central vision.

Ask Tufts Experts

Q. “I often hear people say they are addicted to caffeine. Is that possible?”

Q. “I often hear people say they are addicted to caffeine. Is that possible?”

Q “Are non-stick cooking sprays healthy? Do they add anything to food I need to worry about?”

Q “Are non-stick cooking sprays healthy? Do they add anything to food I need to worry about?”

Q ”I’ve seen ads online for appetite-suppressing supplements. What are these? Do they work?

Q ”I’ve seen ads online for appetite-suppressing supplements. What are these? Do they work?

NewsBites

US Junk Food Tax Is Feasible

A national tax on unhealthy and nonessential “junk foods,” like salty snacks and sugary drinks, would be both legal and administratively doable, according to an analysis in the American Journal of Public Health. A tax could encourage consumers to make better food choices and create an incentive for food manufacturers to make their products less unhealthy.

New Findings on Genes and Fish Consumption

A study combining data on more than 86,000 people in the US and Europe found only weak connections between genetics and levels of consumption of seafood and omega-3 fatty acids. Instead, environmental and personal factors, such as availability of fish and individual food preferences, may play a bigger role in how much fish people consume.

Magnesium-Diabetes Link Stronger from Low-Quality Carb Diets —Subscribers Only

Higher intake of magnesium was associated with a lower risk for diabetes, particularly in people with diets too high in low-quality carbohydrates or low in fiber, according to a study in Diabetes Care.

New Implanted Glucose Monitor —Subscribers Only

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee unanimously recommended approval of a new type of implantable glucose monitoring device that can be left in place much longer than previous types. The new sensor is a cylinder measuring about 3/4-inch long and 1/8-inch wide. It’s inserted just under the skin on the upper arm under local anesthesia.

Special Reports

Walking: Key To Staying Active and Independent

Did you get your 10,000 steps today? Many people have adopted this daily walking goal to obtain the recommended amount of physical activity. The 10,000-steps-a-day number comes from the Japanese brand name of a pedometer manufactured in the 1960s, the “10,000 steps meter.” In the Fitbit era, counting daily steps remains appealing to many people as a source of motivation.

Osteoarthritis and Exercise

Wear-and-tear arthritis (osteoarthritis) breaks down the cushion of cartilage that allows joints to flex without grinding bone-on-bone. As the cartilage breaks down, it brings pain, stiffness and swelling. People with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee may experience pain when walking, but actually walking and other forms of low-impact exercise can help to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms

Salad: The Nutritional Powerhouse

When people resolve to “eat better,” one of the first things they think of is to start eating more salads. After all, the structure of a great salad is built on vegetables, particularly leafy greens. Vegetables, along with fruits, are the foundation of healthy eating patterns, as emphasized by the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. For a 2,000-calorie diet, the Guidelines recommend the equivalent of about 5 cups of vegetables and fruits per day.