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May 2018

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full Issue PDF —Subscribers Only

Download The Full Issue PDF

Articles

Choosing a Healthy Diet

Atkins, Flexitarian, F-Factor, Flat Belly, Paleo, South Beach, TLC—these are just some of the numerous diets to choose from. Which is best for you?

The Health Benefits of Nuts —Subscribers Only

Nuts are a source of unsaturated fats and fiber as well as protein. Nuts are a good source of vitamin E and magnesium—which most Americans don’t get enough of—and other essential vitamins and minerals. Nuts also contain a variety of plant chemicals which some research has linked to reduced risk of chronic diseases. In short, nuts deliver a lot of nutrition in a small package.

Are There ‘Natural’ Remedies for High Cholesterol? —Subscribers Only

If you Google “natural remedies for high cholesterol” you will get millions of hits. As you scroll through them, you’ll see that what “natural” means is in the eye of the beholder. For many people, natural means dietary supplements or “superfoods” thought to have special cholesterol-fighting properties. But in the end, based on good-quality science, the “natural” remedy for high cholesterol is sustained lifestyle change.

Ask Tufts Experts

Q. What’s the difference between studies that show an “association” and those that show “cause and effect.”

Q. What’s the difference between studies that show an “association” and those that show “cause and effect.”

Q. My husband and I use a lot of olive oil. Are canola, corn and other plant oils as healthy?

Q. My husband and I use a lot of olive oil. Are canola, corn and other plant oils as healthy?

Q. I’ve heard that sprouted whole grains have more nutrients than others grains and are more digestible. Is this true?

Q. I’ve heard that sprouted whole grains have more nutrients than others grains and are more digestible. Is this true?

NewsBites

New Diabetes Types Could Guide Treatment

Researchers in Sweden have reclassified diabetes into five different types, each with unique characteristics that could help doctors to identify people most at risk of diabetes complications and treat the disease more effectively.

Good News for Quinoa Fans

Latin Americans have cultivated quinoa, a nutritious seed, for thousands of years. However, newer consumers of the “golden grain” may detect subtle bitter notes in cooked quinoa—mainly because of substances in the outer husk or bran of the seed called saponins.

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Early Dementia

Alcohol use disorders are strongly linked to risk of dementia in people less than age 65, according to a study in Lancet Public Health. More commonly referred to as alcoholism, alcohol use disorder means a persistent pattern of harmful alcohol use or dependence on alcohol.

How Fiber Controls Blood Sugar

Dietary fiber may help to control blood sugar in people with diabetes by supporting beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, according to as study in Science. The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse assemblage of bacteria—the gut biota. A select group of these bacteria produce chemicals called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) when they break down dietary fiber. These substances nourish the gut lining and help control inflammation and appetite. Some studies have linked a deficiency in SCFAs to diabetes.

Special Reports

Vitamin K Shows Promise Against Arthritis

Vitamin K is an essential fat-soluble nutrient found in leafy green vegetables, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. It plays a key role in the body’s system for controlling bleeding. Now, Tufts’ HNRCA scientists are exploring vitamin K’s potential role in keeping joint cartilage healthy.

Is There An Anti-Arthritis Diet?

The short answer is “We don’t know,” but some studies have linked dietary factors to increased risk of aching joints. For example, some observational research suggests that higher intake of saturated fat, relative to unsaturated fats, is associated with progression of osteoarthritis. Conversely, higher intake of unsaturated fat was linked to less progression.