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March 2018

Full Issue (PDF)

Download The Full Issue PDF —Subscribers Only

Download The Full Issue PDF

Articles

Weight Loss: No Quick Fixes —Subscribers Only

Achieving and maintaining an optimal body weight can be a challenge. For those of us who carry extra pounds that we want or need to shed, it’s tempting to turn to crash dieting in hopes of rapid weight loss.

Should You Drink Your Fruits and Vegetables? —Subscribers Only

Many Americans are drinking, not munching, their fruits and vegetables as juices and smoothies—presumably for the convenience and to obtain a range of promised health benefits. But the benefits of juicing and blending aren’t yet well supported by scientific evidence.

Soy: Still Good for the Heart?

Since 1999, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has allowed manufacturers of soy-based food products to claim that “consumption of 25 grams of soy protein a day, as a part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.” This package labeling language was authorized based on preliminary evidence that incorporating soy in your daily meals can lower “bad” LDL cholesterol levels enough to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Ask Tufts Experts

Q. I often read that to help reduce risk of heart disease, I should limit processed meats. Are low-sodium deli sliced turkey breast and uncured turkey pastrami better choices?

Q. I often read that to help reduce risk of heart disease, I should limit processed meats. Are low-sodium deli sliced turkey breast and uncured turkey pastrami better choices?

Q. What is cardiometabolic disease and how is it different from cardiovascular disease?

Q. What is cardiometabolic disease and how is it different from cardiovascular disease?

Q. Is it safe to drink one diet soda a day? My doctor says one should be fine, but I read a lot of bad things about diet beverages.

Q. Is it safe to drink one diet soda a day? My doctor says one should be fine, but I read a lot of bad things about diet beverages.

NewsBites

RDs Predict Fermented Foods Will Be Top Trend for 2018

A national survey of registered dietitians predicts that 2018’s top consumer interest will be fermented foods, such as yogurt, kefir, kombucha (fermented sweet tea), sauerkraut, tempeh, some pickles, kimchi and miso. Pollock Communications, a public relations firm, and the magazine Today’s Dietitian conducted the survey of 2,050 nutrition professionals.

Leafy Greens Protect Aging Brains

Older adults who ate 1 to 2 daily servings of leafy green vegetables showed less age-related decline in memory and other mental skills than those eating less, according to a study in Neurology.

Almonds and Chocolate Good for Cholesterol

Eating almonds or almonds and dark chocolate together, but not dark chocolate alone, improves blood cholesterol, says a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Thirty-one overweight or obese participants, ages 30 to 70, consumed four test diets for 4 weeks each, in random order. Each of the test diets included take-home meals consistent with an average American diet, with one serving as a control and the other three being enhanced with (a)…

Greater Availability of Exercise Facilities Linked to Smaller Waistlines

Living in an area with a higher number of gyms and other exercise facilities nearby is associated with smaller waistlines, lower body mass index (BMI) and less body fat, according to a study in Lancet Public Health. Researchers tapped a national database of health information on about 400,000 people, ages 40 to 70, from across the United Kingdom. They correlated these data with information on the number of exercise facilities such as gyms, swimming pools and playing fields within about a half mile.

Special Reports

Calcium, Vitamin D and Bone Health: Should You Take Supplements? —Subscribers Only

How many times have you heard the message that Americans—particularly older adults—need adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D for bone health? Major fractures of the hip or spine, often as the result of a fall, can send people to hospitals and nursing homes and raise the risk of disability and death. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends daily intake of 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams (mg) of calcium and 600 to 800 international units (IU) of vitamin D, depending on age.