Subscriber Only

Inside Tufts HNRCA Laboratory of Nutrition, Exercise, Physiology and Sarcopenia-on the front lines of the fight against frailty. At 711 Washington Street, in the heart of downtown Boston, you will find the worlds largest research center on nutrition and aging. With over 300 scientists, the Tufts Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) has been advancing the knowledge of human nutrition since 1979
This category can only be viewed by members. To view this category, sign up by purchasing Tufts Health & Nutrition Subscription.

Your Muscles: Secrets of Aging Gracefully

Inside Tufts HNRCA Laboratory of Nutrition, Exercise, Physiology and Sarcopenia-on the front lines of the fight against frailty. At 711 Washington Street, in the heart of downtown Boston, you will find the worlds largest research center on nutrition and aging. With over 300 scientists, the Tufts Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) has been advancing the knowledge of human nutrition since 1979

Low-Carb Diets High in Meat Riskier Than Veggie Versions

I f youre tempted to try an Atkins-style diet, go easy on the steak and bacon. A new analysis of data on nearly 130,000 men and women over more than two decades reports that low-carb diets relying more on meat for fat and protein were associated with a 23% increased risk of death. On the other hand, low-carb diets with higher intakes of vegetables and fruit were associated with a lower risk of dying.

Green Tea Boosts Fullness

S ipping a cup of green tea with a meal may help you feel more full and less likely to go back for seconds. Thats the conclusion of Swedish researchers, who compared the post-meal effects of green tea with plain water. Their study failed, however, to confrm hopes that the antioxidant-rich tea would also moder- ate insulin sensitivity or glucose levels, helping to curb diabetes risk. Research- ers observed study participants for two hours after a meal, quizzing them on satiety and how full they felt. Not only did participants report feeling more full when accompanying the meal with a cup of green tea, they were also less interested in eating another mouthful of the same food. When washing down the meal with plain water, participants were later more of a mind to go for a second helping.

Extra Vitamin E Found Safe Yet Ineffective; Debate Goes On

The good news from a new pooled analysis of 57 studies is that, despite some red flags from previous research, vitamin E supplements are safe and dont increase the risk of death. But neither do the once-highly touted supplements help you live longer, the review reports, despite hopes their antioxidant effects might fight chronic disease. Calling their meta-analysis the largest and most inclusive to date, scientists concluded in Current Aging Science that vitamin E supplementation cannot be endorsed as a means of reducing mortality

Healthy Eating Can Put Metabolic Syndrome into Reverse

C an metabolic syndrome be reversed by eating right? A new study says the answer is yes. Metabolic syndrome is an increasingly common term covering a complex of conditions, including central obesity (high waist-hip ratio), high blood pressure, unhealthy blood cholesterol levels and insulin resistance. Together, this cluster of risk factors sharply increases the danger of developing heart disease and diabetes. According to the American Heart Association, more than 50 million Americans suffer from metabolic syndrome.

Consumers Mixed on High-Fructose Corn Syrup

Despite assur- ances from the Corn Refners Association-which recently peti- tioned the FDA to allow high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to be labeled corn sugar-the public remains wary about the common sweetener, accord- ing to another Mintel report. In a new survey, 35% of consumers said they avoid products containing HFCS and 84% think government should require companies to disclose the quantity of HFCS in products. Todays consum- ers are demanding transparency across the board, commented Krista Faron, lead innovation analyst at Mintel. And when it comes to an ingredi- ent as controversial as high-fructose corn syrup, the majority of Americans clearly want complete information that will help them make informed purchase decisions. By a 45%-35% margin, however, those surveyed op- posed government limits on HFCS use. And 64% of consumers still think the sweetener is OK in modera- tion-an opinion that most experts, pending further research, would prob- ably agree with.

Berries Linked to Lower Parkinsons Risk

Plus new clues to the disease from ibuprofen and vitamin D. Three new studies are shedding light on the mysteries of Parkinsons disease, one of the most common nervous system disorders with aging. A neurodegenerative brain disorder that leads to tremors and difficulty with movement and coordination, Parkinsons most often develops after age 50; 50,000-60,000 new US cases are diagnosed annually