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A furry of new research on fsh-oil supplements is raising eyebrows as well as questions about just how miraculous those omega-3 fatty acids really are. Live long, stay strong, say the ads for fsh-oil pills, touting not only omega-3s familiar heart-health benefts but also mental and cellular protection. But recent clinical trials have reminded nutrition scientists that, after all, the strongest data linking omega-3s and reduced cardiovascular risk come from observational studies: Overall, people who eat more fsh have lower rates of heart disease. Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of Tufts HNRCA Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, points out, however, that people who eat more fsh also tend to be more physically active, less likely to smoke and to eat a healthier diet in general, including more fruits and vegetables and probably less meat and cheese. Should the fsh oils alone get the credit for healthier hearts-or are omega-3s only part of the story?

Are Fish-Oil Pills Right for You? The latest findings on fish-oil supplements may be...

A furry of new research on fsh-oil supplements is raising eyebrows as well as questions about just how miraculous those omega-3 fatty acids really are. Live long, stay strong, say the ads for fsh-oil pills, touting not only omega-3s familiar heart-health benefts but also mental and cellular protection. But recent clinical trials have reminded nutrition scientists that, after all, the strongest data linking omega-3s and reduced cardiovascular risk come from observational studies: Overall, people who eat more fsh have lower rates of heart disease. Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of Tufts HNRCA Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, points out, however, that people who eat more fsh also tend to be more physically active, less likely to smoke and to eat a healthier diet in general, including more fruits and vegetables and probably less meat and cheese. Should the fsh oils alone get the credit for healthier hearts-or are omega-3s only part of the story?

European Study Finds No Extra Bladder-Cancer Risk for Meat Eaters

In a rare bit of good news for red-meat lovers, a study of nearly a half-million people from 10 European countries has found no link between eating red or processed meat and risk of bladder cancer

Food and Your Mood New research focuses on how what you eat affects how...

Maybe its not just the sunny climate, dazzling blue sea and bountiful beaches that make people living around the Mediterranean more cheerful. Prior research has shown that the lifetime prevalence of mental disorders is lower in Mediter - ranean countries than in northern Europe. Now a new Spanish study suggests that part of the explanation might be the so-called Mediterranean diet.

What You Can Do About Arthritis Arthritis pain is on the rise and science...

A rthritis is increasingly affecting our daily lives-and new research fnd- ings seem to dash any hopes that the most popular supplements thought to combat arthritis do any good. Yet amidst this gloomy picture, scientists are discovering clues to how you might make a difference against arthritis by smart choices in your diet.

Alpha-Carotene Linked to Lower Mortality Rates

A lpha-carotene, the often-overlooked cousin of more familiar beta-caro- tene, may help you live longer-and further explain the health benefts of eating vegetables and fruits. Researchers at the CDC, studying data on more than 15,000 adults from a national nutrition survey, report that people with the highest blood levels of alpha-carotene were 39% less likely to die from all causes over almost 14 years.

Findings Cast Doubt on Glycemic-Index Appetite Effects

Fad diets have touted using the glycemic index (GI)-a measure of how quickly a food boosts blood sugar-as a magic bullet for targeting weight loss. But science keeps finding that the facts are more complicated

Ginkgo Fails to Prevent Heart Attacks or Strokes But study suggests possible benefit against...

The herbal treatment ginkgo biloba struck out in another major test, this time of its purported ability to prevent heart attacks and strokes. But researchers were surprised by a possible benefit of ginkgo in preventing peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Regular Workouts Reduce Uterus Cancer Risk by 30%

H eres more motivation to get going on a program of regular physical activity: A new National Cancer Institute re- view of 14 prior studies reports that women who regularly exercise reduced their risk of endometrial cancer by about 30%. On the other hand, women who spend more of their day sitting were at greater risk of the can- cer, which affects the lining of the uterus.

Low-Fat Isnt Always Healthier, Nutrition Experts Caution

I f you want to eat a healthier diet, cut out the fat-right? Wrong, according to experts at the American Dietetic As- sociation (ADA) Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo, in a panel on The Great Fat Debate. If you replace dietary fat, even saturated fat such as butter and whole milk, with sugar and other carbohydrates, you could actually be increas- ing your risk of heart disease.

News About Soft Drinks

Quenching your thirst for answers about sodas and your health. Soft-drink lovers who thought they were doing something good for their health got a jolt-not the highly caffeinated soda kind-earlier this year when a report linked diet sodas to greater risk of stroke and heart attack. The surprising findings captured headlines and blared over the nightly news: In a study of 2,564 people