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Recipes March 2010 Issue

Whole-Grain Pasta with Cauliflower & Broccoli

Bring a large pot of water to a boil for cooking pasta.

Combine 1 teaspoon oil and panko in small skillet. Place over medium-low heat and toast, stirring constantly, until golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to small bowl. Heat remaining 1 tsp oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat.

Add onion; cook, stirring often, until softened and starting to turn golden, 4 to 5 minutes. Add garlic, anchovy and crushed red pepper; cook, stirring and mashing anchovy, until fragrant, 20 to 30 seconds. Remove from heat. Meanwhile, add pasta to boiling water; cook 5 minutes. Add broccoli and cauliflower; cook until pasta is al dente and vegetables are tender, 3 to 4 minutes longer. Reserve 2/3 cup cooking water; drain pasta and vegetables. Add pasta, vegetables, reserved cooking water, cheese and black pepper to onion mixture in skillet. Cook, over medium heat, tossing, for 1 to 2 minutes to allow pasta to absorb flavors of sauce. Serve immediately, sprinkled with toasted panko. 

Yield: 2 (2-cup) servings

Per serving: Calories: 361. Total fat: 12 grams. Saturated fat: 4 grams. Cholesterol: 19 milligrams. Sodium: 418 milligrams. Carbohydrates: 49 grams: Fiber: 7 grams. Protein: 17 grams.

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp olive oil, divided
  • 4 tsp panko bread crumbs (see ingredient note)
  • 1 cup onion (medium) thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp anchovy paste or anchovy filet, rinsed and minced
  • 1/8 tsp crushed red pepper flakes or to taste
  • 1 1/4 cups whole-grain farfalle, shells or penne pasta
  • 1 cup broccoli florets
  • 1 cup cauliflower florets
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
Variation: Substitute 1/2 lb broccoli rabe or broccolini (trim stem ends, then cut stalks, leaves and florets into 1-inch pieces) for broccoli and cauliflower. Ingredient Note: Panko, also known as Japanese-style bread crumbs, are coarse bread crumbs. You can find them next to other bread crumbs in most large supermarkets.

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